Creating Azure Virtual Networks using Powershell and XML Part 2: Powershell functions

In my previous post I talked about what was involved in creating an Azure network configuration using Powershell. In this post I’ll cover where I’ve got so so far, which is a series of functions that do the following:

  1. Contact Azure and get the current network configuration. Convert that to sensible XML and if it’s empty, create the basic structure.
  2. Create a new virtual network, checking to see if one with the same name already exists.
  3. Add a subnet to a virtual network, checking to see one with the same address prefix or name doesn’t already exist.
  4. Add a DNS reference to a virtual network, making sure the DNS is defined first.
  5. Create a DNS.
  6. Put the configuration back into Azure to be applied.

Still on my to-do list are removing networks and other elements, and modifying existing networks.

The Function Code

The end result so far is a powershell script that can be loaded to give a number of new functions:

Get-azureNetworkXml

get-azureNetworkXml runs the get-AzureVNetConfig command. It takes the XMLConfiguration from that command and puts it into a new XML object. If there is no configuration, it creates a new xml object. It then checks to see if the main XML elements are present and, if not, creates them.

Whilst this function returns an object, I need to make sure (right now) that the variable nme I use for that is $workingVnetConfig as other functions reference it. I’m not currently passing the XML object into each function. I probably should, but that tidying comes later.

function get-azureNetworkXml {  $currentVNetConfig = get-AzureVNetConfig if ($currentVNetConfig -ne $null) { [xml]$workingVnetConfig = $currentVNetConfig.XMLConfiguration } else { $workingVnetConfig = new-object xml }  $networkConfiguration = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("NetworkConfiguration") if ($networkConfiguration.count -eq 0) { $newNetworkConfiguration = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "NetworkConfiguration" $newNetworkConfiguration.SetAttribute("xmlns:xsd","http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema") $newNetworkConfiguration.SetAttribute("xmlns:xsi","http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance") $networkConfiguration = $workingVnetConfig.AppendChild($newNetworkConfiguration) }  $virtualNetworkConfiguration = $networkConfiguration.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkConfiguration") if ($virtualNetworkConfiguration.count -eq 0) { $newVirtualNetworkConfiguration = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "VirtualNetworkConfiguration" $virtualNetworkConfiguration = $networkConfiguration.AppendChild($newVirtualNetworkConfiguration) }  $dns = $virtualNetworkConfiguration.GetElementsByTagName("Dns") if ($dns.count -eq 0) { $newDns = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "Dns" $dns = $virtualNetworkConfiguration.AppendChild($newDns) }  $virtualNetworkSites = $virtualNetworkConfiguration.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkSites") if ($virtualNetworkSites.count -eq 0) { $newVirtualNetworkSites = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "VirtualNetworkSites" $virtualNetworkSites = $virtualNetworkConfiguration.AppendChild($newVirtualNetworkSites) }  return $workingVnetConfig } 

Save-azureNetworkXml

Save-azureNetworkXml gets passed our XML object, writes it out to a file in the temp dir and then calls set-AzureVNetConfig to load the file and send it to Azure.

function save-azureNetworkXml($workingVnetConfig) { $tempFileName = $env:TEMP + "\azurevnetconfig.netcfg" $workingVnetConfig.save($tempFileName) notepad $tempFileName  set-AzureVNetConfig -configurationpath $tempFileName } 

Add-azureVnetNetwork

Add-azureVnetNetwork is called with three parameters: networkName, affinityGroup and addressPrefix. It will add a new VirtualNetworkSite element, with the name and affinity group as attributes. It checks to make sure the affinity group exists first. It then creates the address prefix within the network.

function add-azureVnetNetwork { param ( [string]$networkName, [string]$affinityGroup, [string]$addressPrefix )  #check if the network already exists $networkExists = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkSite") | where {$_.name -eq $networkName} if ($networkExists.Count -ne 0) { 	write-Output "Network $networkName already exists" 	$newNetwork = $null 	return $newNetwork }   #check that the target affinity group exists $affinityGroupExists = get-AzureAffinityGroup | where {$_.name -eq $affinityGroup} if ($affinityGroupExists -eq $null) { 	write-Output "Affinity group $affinityGroup does not exist" 	$newNetwork = $null 	return $newNetwork }  #get the parent node $workingNode = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkSites") #add the new network node $newNetwork = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "VirtualNetworkSite" $newNetwork.SetAttribute("name",$networkName) $newNetwork.SetAttribute("AffinityGroup",$affinityGroup ) $network = $workingNode.appendchild($newNetwork)  #add new address space node $newAddressSpace = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "AddressSpace" $AddressSpace = $Network.appendchild($newAddressSpace) $newAddressPrefix = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "AddressPrefix" $newAddressPrefix.InnerText=$addressPrefix  $AddressSpace.appendchild($newAddressPrefix)  #return our new network $newNetwork = $network return $newNetwork   } 

Add-azureVnetSubnet

Add-azureVnetSubnet takes three parameters: networkName, subnetName and addressPrefix. It makes sure the network exists, that the subnet doesn’t, and that the address prefix is not already used in the same network. It then adds the subnet to the network.

function add-azureVnetSubnet { param ( [string]$networkName, [string]$subnetName, [string]$addressPrefix )  #get our target network $workingNode = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkSite") | where {$_.name -eq $networkName} if ($workingNode.Count -eq 0) { 	write-Output "Network $networkName does not exist" 	$newSubnet = $null 	return $newSubnet }  #check if the subnets node exists and if not, create $subnets = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("Subnets") if ($subnets.count -eq 0) { $newSubnets = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "Subnets" $subnets = $workingNode.appendchild($newSubnets) }  #check to make sure our subnet name doesn't exist and/or prefix isn't already there $subNetExists = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("Subnet") | where {$_.name -eq $subnetName} if ($subNetExists.count -ne 0) { 	write-Output "Subnet $subnetName already exists" 	$newSubnet = $null 	return $newSubnet  } $subNetExists = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("Subnet") | where {$_.AddressPrefix -eq $subnetName} if ($subNetExists.count -ne 0) { 	write-Output "Address prefix $addressPrefix already exists in another network" 	$newSubnet = $null 	return $newSubnet  }  #add the subnet $newSubnet = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "Subnet" $newSubnet.SetAttribute("name",$subnetName) $subnet = $subnets.appendchild($newSubnet) $newAddressPrefix = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "AddressPrefix" $newAddressPrefix.InnerText = $addressPrefix  $subnet.appendchild($newAddressPrefix)  #return our new subnet $newSubnet = $subnet return $newSubnet  } 

Add-azureVnetDns

Add-azureVnetDns takes two parameters: dnsName and dnsAddress. It then creates a new DnsServer element for that DNS.

function add-azureVnetDns { param ( [string]$dnsName, [string]$dnsAddress )  #check that the DNS does not exist $dnsExists = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("DnsServer") | where {$_.name -eq $dnsName} if ($dnsExists.Count -ne 0) { 	write-Output "DNS Server $dnsName already exists" 	$newDns = $null 	return $newDns } # get our working node of Dns $workingNode = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("Dns")  #check if the DnsServersRef node exists and if not, create $dnsServers = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("DnsServers") if ($dnsServers.count -eq 0) { $newDnsServers = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "DnsServers" $dnsServers = $workingNode.appendchild($newDnsServers) }  #add new dns reference $newDnsServer = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "DnsServer" $newDnsServer.SetAttribute("name",$dnsName) $newDnsServer.SetAttribute("IPAddress",$dnsAddress) $newDns = $dnsServers.appendchild($newDnsServer)  #return our new dnsRef return $newDns   } 

Add-azureVnetDnsRef

Add-azureVnetDnsRef takes two parameters; networkName and dnsName. It makes sure the network exists and that the DNS exists before adding a DnsServerRef element for the DNS to the network.

function add-azureVnetDnsRef { param ( [string]$networkName, [string]$dnsName )  #get our target network $workingNode = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("VirtualNetworkSite") | where {$_.name -eq $networkName} if ($workingNode.count -eq 0) { 	write-Output "Network $networkName does not exist" 	$newSubnet = $null 	return $newSubnet }  #check if the DnsServersRef node exists and if not, create $dnsServersRef = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("DnsServersRef") if ($dnsServersRef.count -eq 0) { $newDnsServersRef = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "DnsServersRef" $dnsServersRef = $workingNode.appendchild($newDnsServersRef) }  #check that the DNS we want to reference is defined already $dnsExists = $workingVnetConfig.GetElementsByTagName("DnsServer") | where {$_.name -eq $dnsName} if ($dnsExists.Count -eq 0) { 	write-Output "DNS Server $dnsName does not exist so cannot be referenced" 	$newDnsRef = $null 	return $newDnsRef }  #check that the dns reference isn't already there $dnsRefExists = $workingNode.GetElementsByTagName("DnsServerRef") | where {$_.name -eq $dnsName} if ($dnsRefExists.count -ne 0) { 	write-Output "DNS reference $dnsName already exists" 	$newDnsRef = $null 	return $newDnsRef }  #add new dns reference $newDnsServerRef = create-newXmlNode -nodeName "DnsServerRef" $newDnsServerRef.SetAttribute("name",$dnsName) $newDnsRef = $dnsServersRef.appendchild($newDnsServerRef)  #return our new dnsRef return $newDnsRef   } 

Create-newXmlNode

Create-newXmlNode is called by all the other functions. It creates a new node in the XML object then hands it back to the calling function for modification and appending it to the relevant parent node.

function create-newXmlNode { param ( [string]$nodeName )  $newNode = $workingVnetConfig.CreateElement($nodeName,"http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2011/07/NetworkConfiguration") return $newNode } 

Using the functions

Assuming all our functions are in a powershell file called Create-AzureNetwork.ps1, using the new functions is pretty straightforward. We load the functions from file (there is a space between the first . and the .\ in the first line. We can then call the functions.

Note that I use a variable called $workingVnetConfig here – that’s important, as we don’t pass the XML into each function, but rather use the way powershell handles variables which means that having defined it here, it’s available to all the functions when called.

. .\Create-AzureNetwork.ps1  $workingVnetConfig = get-azurenetworkxml  add-azureVnetNetwork -networkName "Mynetwork" -affinityGroup "MyAzureAffinity" -addressPrefix "10.0.0.0/8"  add-azureVnetSubnet -networkName "Mynetwork" -subnetName "subnet-1" -addressPrefix "10.0.0.0/11"  add-azureVNetDns -dnsName "test1" -dnsAddress "10.0.0.1"  add-azureVnetDnsRef -networkName "Mynetwork" -dnsName "test1"  save-azurenetworkxml($workingVnetConfig) 

It’s not the most elegant of code, I’ll admit, but it does what it says on the tin. All I have to do now is add functions to remove items from our network configuration, then add functions to modify existing items.

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