But it works on my PC!

The random thoughts of Richard Fennell on technology and software development

Get rid of that that zombie build

Whilst upgrading a TFS 2010 server to 2012 I had a problem that a build was showing in the queue as active after the upgrade. This build was queued in January, 10 months ago, so should have finished a long long time ago. This build had the effect that it blocked any newly queued builds, but the old build did not appear to be running on any agent – a zombie build.

I tried to stop it, delete it, everything I could think of, all to no effect. It would not go away.

In the end I had to use the brute force solution to delete the rows in the TPC’s SQL DB for the build. I did this in both the tbl_BuildQueue (use the QueueID) and tbl_Build (use the buildID) tables.

Fix for - Could not load file or assembly 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.Shell’ on TFS 2010 Build Controller

I have previously posted about when TFS build controllers don’t start properly. Well I saw the same problem today whilst upgrading a TFS 2010 server to TFS 2012.3. The client did not want to immediately upgrade their build processes and decided to keep their 2010 build VMs just pointing them at the updated server (remember TFS 2012.2 and later servers can support either 2012 or 2010 build controllers).

The problem was that when we restarted the build service the controller and agents appeared to start, but then we got a burst of errors in the event log and we saw the controller say it was ready, but have the stopped icon.

On checking the Windows error log we saw the issue was it could not load the assembly

Exception Message: Problem with loading custom assemblies: Could not load file or assembly 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.Shell, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified. (type Exception)

Turns out this was because the StyleCop.VSPackage.dll has been checked into the build controllers CustomAssemblies folder (how and why we never found out, also why it had not failed before was unclear as it was checked in about 6 weeks ago!). Anyway as soon as the DLL was removed from the custom assemblies folder, leaving just the StyleCop files from the c:\program Files (x86)|StyleCop\4.7 folder all was OK.

‘TF400499: You have not set your team field’ when trying to update Team Settings via the TFS API

I have recently been automating TFS admin processes such as creating a new team within an existing team project. The TFS team is now our primary means we use to segment work so we need to create new teams fairly often, so automation makes good sense.

As far as I can see, there are no command line tools, like TF.EXE or WITADMIN.EXE, to do most of the team operations. They are usually browser based. So I have been using PowerShell and the TFS API for the automation.

I hit the problem that when trying to save the team’s backlog iteration, iteration paths etc. for a newly created team using  the SetTeamSettings method. I was seeing

Exception calling "SetTeamSettings" with "2" argument(s): "TF400499: You have not set your team field."
At C:\Projects\tfs2012\TFS\PowerShell\Set-TfsTeamConfig.ps1:37 char:1
+ $configSvc.SetTeamSettings($configs[0].TeamId , $configs[0].TeamSettings)
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [], MethodInvocationException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : SoapException

This was strange as I had previously tested my PowerShell script file with hard coded values to update an existing team without error. When I inspecting the parameters being passed all looked OK, I had set a value for the team field and the read only property defining where to store the team data was correct (into the AreaPath).

After far to long I realised the problem was I had set the team field to the correct value e.g. ‘My project\My team’, but I had not created this area path before trying to reference it. Once I had created the required area path my scripted worked as expect.

So the TF400499 error is a little confusing, it does not mean ‘not set’ but ‘not set to a valid value’

Where did that email go?

We use the TFS Alerts system to signal to our teams what state project build are at. So when a developer changes a build quality to ‘ready for test’ an email is sent to everyone in the team and we make sure the build retention policy is set to keep. Now this is not the standard behaviour of the TFS build alerts system, so we do all this by calling a SOAP based web service which in turn uses the TFS API.

This had all been working well until we did some tidying up and patching on our Exchange server. The new behaviour was:

  • Email sent directly via SMTP by the TFS Alert system  worked
  • Email sent via our web service called by the TFS Alert system disappeared, but no errors were shown

As far as we could see emails were leaving our web service (which was running as the same domain service account as TFS, but its own AppPool) and dying inside our email system, we presumed due to some spam filter rule?

After a bit of digging we spotted the real problem.

If you look at the advanced settings of the TFS Alerts email configuration it points out that if you don’t supply credentials for the SMTP server it passes those for the TFS Service process

image

Historically our internal SMTP server had allowed anonymous posting so this was not an issue, but in our tidy it now required authentication, so this setting became important.

We thought this should not be an issue as the TFS service account was correctly registered in Exchange, and it was working for the TFS generated alert emails, but on checking the code of the web service noticed a vital missing line, we were not setting the credentials on the message, we were leaving it as anonymous, so the email was being blocked

using (var msg = new MailMessage())
            {
                msg.To.Add(to);
                msg.From = new MailAddress(this.fromAddress);
                msg.Subject = subject;
                msg.IsBodyHtml = true;
                msg.Body = body;
                using (var client = new SmtpClient(this.smptServer))
                {
                    client.Credentials = CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
                    client.Send(msg);
                }

            }

Once this line was added and the web service redeployed it worked as expect again

Fix for ‘Cannot install test agent on these machines because another environment is being created using the same machines’

I recently posted about adding extra VMs to existing environments in Lab Management. Whilst following this process I hit a problem, I could not create my new environment there was a problem at the verify stage. It was fine adding the new VMs, but the one I was reusing gave the error ‘Microsoft test manager cannot install test agent on these machines because another environment is being created using the same machines’

image

II had seen this issue before and so I tried a variety of things that had sorted it in the past, removing the TFS Agent on the VM, manually installing and trying to configure them, reading through the Test Controller logs, all to no effect. I eventually got a solution today with the help of Microsoft.

The answer was to do the following on the VM showing the problem

  1. Kill TestAgentInstaller.exe process, if running on failing machine
  2. Delete “TestAgentInstaller” service from services, using sc delete testagentinstaller command (gotcha here, use a DOS style command prompt not PowerShell as sc has a different default meaning in PowerShell, it is an alias for set-content. if using PowerShell you need the full path to the sc.exe)
  3. Delete c:\Windows\VSTLM_RES folder
  4. Restart machine and then try Lab Environment creation again and all should be OK
  5. As usual once the environment is created you might need to restart it to get all the test agents to link up to the controller OK

So it seems that the removal of the VM from its old environment left some debris that was confusing the verify step. Seems this only happens rarely but can be a bit of a show stopper if you can’t get around it

Making the drops location for a TFS build match the assembly version number

A couple of years ago I wrote about using the TFSVersion build activity to try to sync the assembly and build number. I did not want to see build names/drop location in the format 'BuildCustomisation_20110927.17’, I wanted to see the version number in the build something like  'BuildCustomisation 4.5.269.17'. The problem as I outlined in that post was that by fiddling with the BuildNumberFormat you could easily cause an error where duplicated drop folder names were generated, such as

TF42064: The build number 'BuildCustomisation_20110927.17 (4.5.269.17)' already exists for build definition '\MSF Agile\BuildCustomisation'.

I had put this problem aside, thinking there was no way around the issue, until I was recently reviewing the new ALM Rangers ‘Test Infrastructure Guidance’. This had a solution to the problem included in the first hands on lab. The trick is that you need to use the TFSVersion community extension twice in you build.

  • You use it as normal to set the version of your assemblies after you have got the files into the build workspace, just as the wiki documentation shows
  • But you also call it in ‘get mode’ at the start of the build process prior to calling the ‘Update Build Number ‘ activity. The core issue being you cannot call ‘Update Build Number’ more than once else you tend to see the TF42064 issues. By using it in this manner you will set the BuildNumberFomat to the actual version number you want, which will be used for the drops folder and any assembly versioning.

So what do you need to do?

  1. Open you process template for editing (see the custom build activities documentation if you don’t know how to do this)
  2. Find the sequence ‘ Update Build Number for Triggered Builds’ and at the top of the process template

    image
    • Add TFSVersion activity – I called mine ‘Generate Version number for drop’
    • Add an Assign activity – I called mine ‘Set new BuildNumberFormat’
    • Add a WriteBuildMessage activity – This is option but I do like to see what it generated
  3. Add a string variable GeneratedBuildNumber with the scope of ‘Update Build Number for Triggered Builds’

    image
  4. The properties for the TFSVersion activity should be set as shown below

    image
    • The Action is the key setting, this needs to be set to GetVersion, we only need to generate a version number not set any file versions
    • You need to set the Major, Minor and StartDate settings to match the other copy of the activity in your build process. I good tip is to just cut and paste from the other instance to create this one, so that the bulk of the properties are correct
    • The Version needs to be set to you variable GeneratedBuildNumber this is the outputed version value
  5. The properties for the Assign activities are as follows

    image
    • Set To to BuildNumberFormat
    • Set Value to String.Format("$(BuildDefinitionName)_{0}", GeneratedBuildNumber), you can vary this format to meet your own needs [updated 31 Jul 13 - better to use an _ rarther than a space as this will be used in the drop path)
  6. I also added a WriteMessage activity that outputs the generated build value, but that is optional

Once all this was done and saved back to TFS it could be used for a build. You now see that the build name, and drops location is in the form

[Build name] [Major].[Minor].[Days since start date].[TFS build number]

image

This is a slight change from what I previously attempted where the 4th block was the count of builds of a given type on a day, now it is the unique TFS generate build number, the number shown before the build name is generated. I am happy with that. My key aim is reached that the drops location contains the product version number so it is easy to relate a build to a given version without digging into the build reports.

Minor issue on TFS 2012.3 upgrade if you are using host headers in bindings

Yesterday I upgraded our production 2012.2 TFS server to update 3. All seemed to go OK and it completed with no errors, it was so much easier now that the update supports the use of SQL 2012 Availability Groups within the update process, no need to remove the DBs from the availability group prior to the update.

However, though there were no errors it did reported a warning, and on a quick check users could not connects to the upgraded server on our usually https URL.

On checking the update log I saw

[Warning@09:06:13.578] TF401145: The Team Foundation Server web application was previously configured with one or more bindings that have ports that are currently unavailable.  See the log for detailed information.
[Info   @09:06:13.578]
[Info   @09:06:13.578] +-+-+-+-+-| The following previously configured ports are not currently available... |+-+-+-+-+-
[Info   @09:06:13.584]
[Info   @09:06:13.584] 1          - Protocol          : https
[Info   @09:06:13.584]            - Host              : tfs.blackmarble.co.uk
[Info   @09:06:13.584]            - Port              : 443
[Info   @09:06:13.584] port: 443
[Info   @09:06:13.585] authMode: Windows
[Info   @09:06:13.585] authenticationProvider: Ntlm

The issue appears if you use host headers, as we do for our HTTPS bindings. The TFS configuration tool does not understand these, so sees more than one binding in our case on 443  (our TFS server VM also hosts as a nuget server on https 443, we use host headers to separate the traffic) . As the tool does not know what to do with host headers, it just deletes the bindings it does no understand.

Anyway the fix was to  manually reconfigured the HTTPS bindings in IIS and all was OK.

On checking with Microsoft it seems this is a know issue, and on their radar to sort out in future.

A day of TFS upgrades

After last nights release of new TFS and Visual Studio bits at the Build conference I spent this morning upgrading my demo VMs. Firstly I upgraded to TFS 2012.3 and then snapshotting before going onto 2013 Preview. So by changing snapshot I can now demo either version. In both cases the upgrade process was as expected, basically a rerun of the configuration wizard with all the fields bar the password prefilled. Martin Hinshelwood has done a nice post if you want more details on the process

Looking at the session at Build on Channel9 there are not too many on TFS, to find out more about the new features then you are probably better to check out the TechEd USA or TechEd Europe streams.

Why can’t I find my build settings on a Git based project on TFS Service?

Just wasted a bit of time trying to find the build tab on a TFS Team Project hosted on the hosted http://tfs.visualstudio.com using a Git repository. I was looking on team explorer expecting to see something like

image

But all I was seeing the the Visual Studio Git Changes option (just the top bit on the left panel above).

It took to me ages to realise that the issue was I had cloned the Git repository to my local PC using the Visual Studio Tools for Git. So I was just using just Git tools, not TFS tools. As far as Visual Studio was concerned this was just some Git repository it could have been local, GitHub, TFS Service or anything that hosts Git.

To see the full features of TFS Service you need to connect to the service using Team Explorer (the green bits), not just as a Git client (the red bits)

image

Of course if you only need Git based source code management tools, just clone the repository and use the Git tooling, where inside or outside Visual Studio. The Git repository in TFS is just a standard Git repro so all tools should work. From the server end TFS does not care what client you use, in fact it will still associate you commits, irrespective of client, with TFS work items if you use the #1234 syntax for work item IDs in your comments.

However if you are using hosted TFS from Visual Studio, it probably makes more sense to use a Team Explorer connection so all the other TFS feature light up, such as build. The best bit is that all the Git tools are still there as Visual Studio knows it is still just a Git repository. Maybe doing this will be less confusing when I come to try to use a TFS feature!

Using SYSPREP’d VM images as opposed to Templates in a new TFS 2012 Lab Management Environment

An interesting change with Lab Management 2012 and SCVMM 2012 is that templates become a lot less useful. In the SCVMM 2008 versions you had a choice when you stored VMs in the SCVMM library. …

  • You could store a fully configured VM
  • or a generalised template.

When you added the template to a new environment you could enter details such as the machine name, domain to join and product key etc. If you try this with SCVMM 2012 you just see the message ‘These properties cannot be edited from Microsoft Test Manager’

image

So you are meant to use SCVMM to manage everything about the templates, not great if you want to do everything from MTM. However, is that the only solution?

An alternative is to store a SYSPREP’d VM as a Virtual Machine in the SCVMM library. This VM can be added as many times as is required to an environment (though if added more than once you are asked if you are sure)

image

This method does however bring problems of its own. When the environment is started, assuming it is network isolated, the second network adaptor is added as expected. However, as there is no agent on the VM it cannot be configured, usually for a template Lab Management would sort all this out, but because the VM is SYSPREP’d it is left sitting at the mini setup ‘Pick your region’ screen.

You need to manually configure the VM. So the best process I have found is

  1. Create the environment with you standard VMs and the SYSPRED’d one
  2. Boot the environment, the standard ready to use VMs get configured OK
  3. Manually connect to the SYSPREP’d VM and complete the mini setup. You will now have a PC on a workgroup
  4. The PC will have two network adapters, neither connected to you corporate network, both are connected to the network isolated virtual LAN. You have a choice
    • Connect the legacy adaptor to your corporate LAN, to get at a network share via SCVMM
    • Mount the TFS Test Agent ISO
  5. Either way you need to manually install the Test Agent and run the configuration (just select the defaults it should know where the test controller is). This will configure network isolated adaptor to the 192.168.23.x network
  6. Now you can manually join the isolated domain
  7. A reboot the VM (or the environment) and all should be OK

All a bit long winded, but does mean it is easier to build generalised VMs from MTM without having to play around in SCVMM too much. 

I think all would be a good deal easier of the VM had the agents on it before the SYSPREP, I have not tried this yet, but that is true in my option of all VMs used for Lab Management. Get the agents on early as you can, just speeds everything up.