Publishing Access Services Database to SharePoint 2010 gives ‘<URL> did not respond…’

While building a portion of our demo SharePoint 2010 farm, I encountered an error when publishing an Access 2010 database to a SharePoint 2010 Access Services site.

The error which was shown was ‘<URL> did not respond. Either the server does not exist, Microsoft Access Services are not enabled on the server, or the server is using an older version of Microsoft Access Services which is not compatible with Access 2010’:

Access Services Publish Error

After checking that the Access Services farm and web application features were enabled, and that the enterprise features were enabled on the site collection to which I was attempting to publish the Access database (all were fine), I looked in the server application logs on the WFE servers in the demo farm, and on one of the farm servers saw the error ‘There is no default Access Services Application Proxy’:

Event Viewer Error

Checking the Service Application Associations (Central Administration –> Application Management –> Configure service application associations) showed that the Access Database Service proxy was not associated with the default proxy group:

Proxy Associations

After adding the Access Database Service proxy to the default group, publishing the Access database to SharePoint proceeded without a hitch.

In our case, the proxy not being associated with the default proxy group was due to us using PowerShell to configure the Access Service Application. If you do the same, check whether the proxy has been associated with the default group (or whatever proxy group you want it associated with).

Error during SharePoint 2010 Upgrade “Minimal master page failed to provision: could not find master page gallery”

During a recent SharePoint upgrade using the database attach method, I saw the following recorded in the upgrade error log:

[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: SPSite Url=http://intranet.domain.com
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [WARNING] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Minimal master page failed to provision: could not find master page gallery.
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: SPSite Url=http://intranet.domain.com
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [WARNING] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: V4 master page failed to provision: could not find master page gallery.
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: SPSite Url=http://intranet.domain.com

Further information was provided in the upgrade log that accompanies the error log:

[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Setting UIVersion metadata on existing default master page
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Provisioning minimal master page in site: Site1
Site Url: http://intranet.domain.com/Site1
[Powershell] [PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [WARNING] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Minimal master page failed to provision: could not find master page gallery.
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Provisioning V4 master page in site: Site1
Site Url: http://intranet.domain.com/Site1
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [WARNING] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: V4 master page failed to provision: could not find master page gallery.
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [INFO] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Setting UIVersion metadata on existing default master page
[PerWebUpgradeAction (4.0.10.0)] [WARNING] [13/04/2011 15:55:48]: Could not find master page gallery. Metadata on default.master not set.

The farm in question was originally a SharePoint 2003 farm that had been in-place upgraded to SharePoint 2007. The site recorded in the upgrade error log had been created in SharePoint 2003, but had not had its template selected at the time of original creation, allowing the first site user to pick the template to use. Critically however, this had never been done.

Once the database upgrade had been completed, navigating to the site gave me the expected screen to allow me to select the site template to use. Picking a template and clicking OK however produced a ‘file not found’ error.

The moral of the story seems to be ensure that any sites created without selecting a site template should either be completed, or deleted before the upgrade process starts. Note that you can still delete a site that has been upgraded to 2010 in the above state using PowerShell. Detection of sites such as these in SharePoint 2007 is straightforward using stsadm –o enumallwebs – any site that doesn’t have a template shown against it is in this state.

Renaming the PerformancePoint Service Application database in SharePoint 2010

When creating the PerformancePoint Service Application, there is no way to control the name of the database that is created, not even when using PowerShell to create the Service Application. The database that gets created is in the form

<Service Application Name>_GUID

which for some reason a good many DBAs are not too keen on!

The database can however be renamed by following these steps:

  • Stop the PerformancePoint service on all SharePoint servers in the farm that are running the service using the ‘services on servers’ area of Central Administration:
    Stopping the PerformancePoint Service
  • Rename the database and log file – there are two ways of completing this; I prefer the second option of the two outlined below as it completely renames all of the references to the database, but it is a more involved process:
    1. Open SQL Server Management Studio on the SQL Server for the farm.
      Select the PerformancePoint Service Application database and then click again to allow renaming:
      Rename PerformancePoint DB in GUI
      Rename the database to match the naming convention you wish to use for farm databases. Note that this only renames the database friendly name as shown in SQL Server Management Studio and not the file names or the logical database and log file names.
    2. Alternatively:
      Open SQL Server Management Studio on the SQL Server for the farm.
      If you wish to, you can change the recovery mode of the PerformancePoint database to ‘simple’; this saves having to backup and restore a log file as well as the database file.
      Backup the PerformancePoint database created during the Service Application creation process.
      Restore the PerformancePoint database from the backup completed to a new database name which matches the naming convention you wish to use for farm databases. Note that the default naming convention for the log files on restore appends ‘_1’ to the database name to form the log file name; you may wish to change this to ‘_log’ to match the other log files that the database server hosts. The backup and restore will change the filenames used for the databases and the display name shown in SQL Server Management Studio, but not the logical database names. To change the logical database names, first find the logical names of the database and log for the database you wish to change; you can find this information either by taking note of the original database name when it was created, or from the ‘files’ section of the database properties screen within SQL Server Management Studio:
      Database Logical Names
      Execute the following two SQL queries:

      ALTER DATABASE <new PerformancePoint database name> MODIFY FILE (NAME="<original logical database name>", NEWNAME="<new PerformancePoint database name>")

      ALTER DATABASE <new PerformancePoint database name> MODIFY FILE (NAME="<original logical log file name>", NEWNAME="<new PerformancePoint database name>_log")

      If you changed the database recovery mode to ‘simple’, change it back to ‘full’.

  • On one of the SharePoint servers in the farm, open an instance of the SharePoint 2010 Management Shell, ensuring that it is run as administrator and issue the following PowerShell Commands:

    $newdatabasename = "<new PerformancePoint database name>"
    Set-SPPerformancePointServiceApplication -Identity "<name of the PerformancePoint Service Application>" -SettingsDatabase $newdatabasename

  • Restart the PerformancePoint service on the servers in the farm it was running on originally.
  • Delete the original PerformancePoint database that was created during the Service Application creation from SQL Server Management Studio.

Microsoft SharePoint Conference 2009: Day 2

A few highlights from today’s talks:

  • With SharePoint 2010, we no longer have a Shared Service Provider (SSP), instead we now have service application instead. All of the applications benefit from an internal load balancing scheme (fault tolerant round robin load balancing), meaning that as long as you start a service application on more than one server, you’re better protected from failure.  Oh, and yes, that goes for indexing as well!
  • The Service Application framework is extensible; this means you can write your own services to be hosted by SharePoint. These will, in turn, benefit from the internal load balancing scheme mentioned above.  Yes, you can also use a hardware load balancer and from what I gathered, even write your own load balancer!
  • All of your Service Application management can be done from PowerShell – if you don’t know PowerShell, now is going to be a very good time to learn…  If you want to have a look at the available applets, try the following in PowerShell:
    get-SPServiceApplication
    this will return the list of available commandlets.
  • You will be able to add delegated administrators for specific Service Applications. These delegated administrators will have their view of the Central Administration site trimmed to only those items they should see.
  • Claims based auth looks very interesting, and can be extended to allow 3rd party applications to provide additional claims.
  • SharePoint Designer 2010 rocks!