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Enumerating BizTalk 2016 Features for a Command-Line Installation

As with previous versions of BizTalk Server, you can perform the installation using the GUI or a command-line. To use the command-line installation, you’ll need the list of features that can be installed to add to the /AddLocal command-line. The available documentation for a silent installation of BizTalk Server at https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj248690.aspx relate to BizTalk Server 2013 and 2013 R2 (see https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt743078.aspx for ‘BizTalk Server 2016: What’s new, and installation’, then follow the link Appendix A: Silent installation near the bottom of the navigation menu at the left to get to the above page); there’s nothing that I’ve found so far that provides the setup.exe command line switches, or a list of features for use in a silent installation specifically for BizTalk Server 2016. Note that blindly following the previous guidance and using certain specific /AddLocal features results in an installation failure!

Getting hold of the command-line parameters for setup.exe is, of course, simple. Just run setup.exe with the ‘/?’ switch from a command prompt to get the following:

Command Description
/help or /? or /h Help and quick reference option.
/s <Configuration XML file> Silent Installation of features found in Configuration file.
/passive Passive Installation. Only progress bar will be displayed.
/norestart Supress restart.
/forcerestart Always restart after installation.
/promptrestart Prompts before restarting. This option cannot be used with the /quiet option.
/x or /uninstall Uninstalls the product.
/L <Logfile> Writes logging information into a logfile at the specified path. Always uses verbose MSI logging and appends to existing file.
/IGNOREDEPENDENCIES Bypass checks for downloadable prerequisites.
/INSTALLDIR <Install path> Specify the full path to product install location.
/COMPANYNAME <companyname> Sets the company name.
/USERNAME <User name> Sets the user name.
/ADDLOCAL ALL Install all features.
/REMOVE ALL Remove all features.
/REPAIR ALL Repair installation.
/CABPATH <cabfile> Specify a local path to a redistributable CAB file.
/CEIP Opt in to BizTalk Server Customer Experience Improvement Program.

These commands correspond to those listed on the silent installation page for BizTalk 2013 mentioned above with the exception that the final two commands listed on the web page appear to be missing from the above list generated by BizTalk Server 2016.

The /AddLocal command-line parameter details the features that will be installed. On the silent installation web page, there is a link to follow to the list of features (at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkID=189319), however if you browse to that page, you’ll notice that it is marked as the features for BizTalk Server 2010. There are issues using some of the parameters for the installation of BizTalk Server 2016, so it seemed worthwhile attempting to enumerate the parameters that are available to a BizTalk Server 2016 installation.

The installation MSI for BizTalk Server 2016 can be opened using Orca (Orca.exe is a database table editor for creating and editing Windows Installer packages and merge modules – see https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa370557(v=vs.85).aspx for acquisition and installation instructions) to get the list of features. The screen shot below shows a partial view of the ‘Feature’ table from the ‘Microsoft BizTalk Server64.msi’ file:

Orca Features Table for BizTalk Server 2016 MSI

The information in the ‘Feature’ table, along with information gleaned by running the installer, ticking specific single components and then examining the setup log file can be reorganised to give the following:

Feature AddLocal Command
Portal Components BizTalk, WMI, InfoWorkerApps
      Business Activity Monitoring BAMPortal
Developer Tools and SDK BizTalk, WMI, AdapterImportWizard, BizTalkExplorer, BizTalkExtensions, DeploymentWizard, Designer, Development, Migration, MsEDIMigration, MsEDISchemaExtension, MsEDISDK, OrchestrationDesigner, PipelineDesigner, SDK, TrackingProfileEditor, VSTools, WCFDevTools, XMLTools
Documentation Documentation
Server Runtime BizTalk, WMI, Engine, MOT, MSMQ, Runtime
      BizTalk EDI/AS2 Runtime MsEDIAS2, MsEDIAS2StatusReporting
      Windows Communication Foundation Adapter WCFAdapter
Administration Tools and Monitoring BizTalk, WMI, AdminAndMonitoring, AdminTools, BAMTools, BizTalkAdminSnapIn, HealthActivityClient, MonitoringAndTracking, PAM
      Windows Communication Foundation Administration Tools WcfAdapterAdminTools
Additional Software BizTalk, WMI, AdditionalApps
      Enterprise Single Sign-On Administration Module SSOAdmin
      Enterprise Single Sign-On Master Secret Server SSOServer
      Business Rules Components RulesEngine
      MQSeries Agent MQSeriesAgent
      BAM Alert Provider OLAPNS
      BAM CLient FBAMCLIENT
      BAM-Eventing BAMEVENTAPI
      Project Build Component ProjectBuildComponent

Notes:

  • The ‘BizTalk’ and ‘WMI’ feature are specified in numerous places in the table above. You only need to specify each of these items once.
  • The parameters are case sensitive. Specifying a parameter incorrectly, e.g. OlapNs rather than OLAPNS will result in a silent installation failure.
  • When adding the parameters to the command line, it is important that there is no space between the items. Including a space (e.g. ‘BizTalk, WMI, AdditionalApps’ rather than ‘BizTalk,WMI,AdditionalApps’) will result in a silent installation failure.
  • One of the features, ‘SDKScenarios’, is never mentioned in the setup log file. It is assumed that this feature is automatically installed if required by the parent feature (SDK), however including it within the AddLocal command line parameter list doesn’t seem to cause any issues.

Deploying Visual Studio 2017 Using Configuration Manager

Previous versions of Visual Studio were typically delivered via ISO files that we could import into Configuration Manager for deployment to workstations. Visual Studio 2017 arrives as a web installer only (although you can create installation media using the –layout option from the command line if you still want to go down that route).

The command-line parameters of the Visual Studio 2017 installer are also different to previous versions as well, requiring a different approach. See https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/install/use-command-line-parameters-to-install-visual-studio for information on the available command-line parameters.

In the past I’ve tried using an AdminDeployment.xml file to control which components of Visual Studio are installed. With Visual Studio 2013 this worked fine for me. With Visual Studio 2015 I could not make this approach work at all, and ended up specifying the components to be installed by using the ‘/InstallSelectableItems’ command-line parameter, which worked a treat.

Visual Studio uses this latter approach to selecting the components that will be installed with the product, but the system has been extended to provide more control over the component installation, with an ‘IncludeRecommended’ and ‘IncludeOptional’ flag available for each component, or globally, as required. A list of the Visual Studio 2017 workload and component IDs can be found at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/install/workload-and-component-ids (click through to the product you’re installing, for us this was Visual Studio Enterprise 2017, workload and component IDs for which are found at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/install/workload-component-id-vs-enterprise)

For example, to add the Azure development workload, with all optional and recommended components, you’d add the following to the command-line that you issue to the installer:

--add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Azure;includeOptional;includeRecommended

As you can see, this means that the command-line has the potential to get long very quickly!

For the workloads and components I was asked to deploy with Visual Studio Enterprise 2017, our command-line became

mu_visual_studio_enterprise_2017_x86_x64_10049783.exe --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Azure;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Data;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.ManagedDesktop;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.ManagedGame;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NativeCrossPlat --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NativeDesktop --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NativeGame --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NativeMobile --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NetCoreTools;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NetCrossPlat;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.NetWeb;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Node;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Office;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.Universal;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.VisualStudioExtension --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Workload.WebCrossPlat;includeOptional;includeRecommended --add Component.GitHub.VisualStudio --add Microsoft.Component.Blend.SDK.WP --add Microsoft.Component.HelpViewer --add Microsoft.Net.Component.3.5.DeveloperTools --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.LinqToSql --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TestTools.CodedUITest --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TestTools.Core --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TestTools.FeedbackClient --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TestTools.MicrosoftTestManager --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TestTools.WebLoadTest --add Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.TypeScript.2.0 --quiet --norestart --wait

Which, frankly, is huge!

The length of the command-line poses an immediate issue as it’s longer than that allowed in the text box for the installation program for an application. Here’s the approach I took:

  1. Once you’ve determined the workloads and components that are to be installed, create a batch file containing the command line. Prefix the command line with %~dp0 (no backslash or anything; this is to run the command-line from the current directory).
  2. (Optional) Create a batch file to uninstall Visual Studio 2017. My batch file contains the following command:
    %~dp0mu_visual_studio_enterprise_2017_x86_x64_10049783.exe uninstall --quiet –wait
  3. Copy the two batch files created, along with the web installer to a suitable location on the Configuration Manager server, the configure the application as follows:
    1. Create a new application and select ‘manually specify the application information’.
    2. Specify the name for the application, publisher, version and any other information required by your organisation:
      General Application Settings
    3. Specify the appearance of the application in the Application Catalog. Specify the icon by browsing to the web installer and selecting this. One icon is available:
      Application Icon
    4. On the ‘Deployment Type’ page of the wizard, click ‘Add’ and again specify ‘manually specify the deployment type information’.
    5. Provide a name for the deployment type, e.g. ‘Visual Studio Enterprise 2017’ and any required comments.
    6. Specify the content location. This should be the network path where the web installer and two batch files are located, e.g. ‘\\SCCM\Applications\VisualStudioEnterprise2017’.
    7. For the installation program, specify the name (and extension) of the installation batch file you created earlier.
    8. For the uninstall program, specify the uninstallation batch file you created earlier, or the following command-line if you chose not to create a batch file:
      mu_visual_studio_enterprise_2017_x86_x64_10049783.exe -uninstall --quiet –wait
      Content Location and Programs
    9. Specify the detection method that you want to use. I opted for a simple ‘devenv.exe’ version greater than or equal to ‘15.0.26228.4’ which was the version of the file deployed during testing of the installer:
      App Deployment Detection
    10. Specify the user experience settings. Our installation takes approximately 60 minutes. I chose also to allow the maximum run time to be longer than the default 2 hours.
    11. Specify any requirements for the installation. I didn’t have anything to add here.
    12. Specify any dependencies for the installation. Again I didn’t have anything to add here.
    13. Complete the creation of the application by clicking ‘Next’ at the subsequent screens.
  4. Distribute the content by right-clicking the application and selecting ‘Distribute Content’.
  5. Deploy the application and select appropriate collections to deploy it to.
  6. Test!

Note: Installation takes approximately an hour on our workstations, and fails if any other Visual Studio product is running on the workstation during the installation process.

Offline Domain Join with Direct Access

I was recently in the position that I needed to rebuild a workstation at a remote location, but wanted to end up with it joined to the domain, and able to install software via the SCCM Software Center. Enter Offline Domain Join (djoin.exe)!

Offline Domain Join allows the creation of a machine account and the establishment of a trust relationship between a computer running Windows and a Domain. As part of the process, group policy information can also be transferred to the machine that will be joined to the domain.

Assuming Direct Access is available, the appropriate group policy information for Direct Access can be transferred as part of the process, and this should then allow the remote machine to establish a connection to the domain and from there all remaining group policy information can be transferred, the Configuration Manager client installed etc.

Information on ‘djoin.exe’ including examples for use can be found at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/offline-domain-join-djoin-step-by-step

My scenario was:

  • The machine account already existed in the correct OU and was a member of the appropriate groups for Direct Access (the machine name had already been used; this was a rebuild) and therefore I needed to use the ‘/reuse’ parameter.
  • The only group policy information I wanted to transfer to the remote machine was for Direct Access. I anticipated that all other group policy information would be transferred automatically once a Direct Access connection had been established.

In my case, the command I used on the provisioning server were:

djoin /provision /domain domain.com /machine MyWorkstation /savefile MyWorkstation-blob.txt /reuse /policynames “Direct Access Client”

The resultant blob should be transferred securely – take note of what the TechNet page says on the matter:

The base64-encoded metadata blob that is created by the provisioning command contains very sensitive data. It should be treated just as securely as a plaintext password. The blob contains the machine account password and other information about the domain, including the domain name, the name of a domain controller, the security ID (SID) of the domain, and so on. If the blob is being transported physically or over the network, care must be taken to transport it securely.

On the remote workstation, the command I used was:

djoin /requestODJ /loadfile MyWorkstation-blob.txt /windowspath %SystemRoot% /localos

At this point you’re prompted to reboot the workstation. Once the reboot was complete, I left the machine for a few minutes to allow it to establish a connection, then signed in. Everything worked as anticipated and I could log in as a domain user and a Direct Access connection was established. Following a group policy update, the Configuration Manager client was transferred and installed, and a short time later the Software Center became available and I could add software made available from SCCM.

DPM Protection for Windows 10 Anniversary Edition

Attempting to add protection to a Windows 10 Anniversary Edition workstation recently failed with the DPM server showing the workstation as ‘unavailable’ when looking at the ‘Production Servers’ list in the console.

It appears that the upgrade to Anniversary Edition removes a file that the DPM agent relies on, ‘sisbkup.dll’, and that as a consequence the services cannot start on the protected workstation.

The resolution is to copy the ‘sisbkup.dll’ file from c:\Windows\System32 on an older version of Windows 10 into C:\Windows\System32 on the Anniversary Update machine and then retry the connection from DPM.

Web Application Proxy Failure Following Outage

Following a ‘hiccup’, involving a Web Application Proxy (WAP) server, internal services were no longer being published to the outside world.

After some investigation, both the ADFS and WAP services showed as stopped on the server. Attempting to start the ADFS service from the services console produced the following error:

Windows could not start the Active Directory Federation Service service on Local Computer.
Error 1064: An exception occurred in the service when handling the control request.

Under the System section of the Windows Event Log, the following error was shown:

Event ID: 7023
The Active Directory Federation Services service terminated with the following error:
An exception occurred in the service when handling the control request.

Followed a few moments later by the following error:

Event ID: 7023
The Web Application Proxy Service terminated with the following error:
A certificate is required to complete client authentication

Looking in the ‘AD FS’ section of the Event Log (under ‘Applications and Services Logs’), the following errors were shown (note that the first error was generally shown multiple times, followed by a single instance of the second error):

Event ID: 383
The Web request failed because the web.config is malformed.
User Action:
Fix the malformed data in the web.config file.
Exception details:
Root element is missing (C:\Windows\ADFS\Config\microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice.exe.config)
Root element is missing.

Followed by:

Event ID: 199
The federation server proxy could not be started.
Reason: Error retrieving proxy configuration from the Federation Service.
Additional Data
Exception details:
An error occurred when attempting to load the proxy configuration.

Checking the file at C:\Windows\ADFS\Config\microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice.exe.config showed that while the file size was still indicated as 2k, the file was blank.

I’ve seen a number of reports online indicating that WAP seems happy to chew up the contents of this configuration file following an outage, although I can find no information on why this might happen. If you have a backup of the file in question, it should be a simple matter to restore this file and restart the ADFS and WAP services to restore service. If you don’t, and have no other example server from which you can pull a similar copy of the file then the following steps must be taken:

  1. Remove the Web Application Proxy role from the server. Once this is complete, a reboot will be required.
  2. Re-add the Web Application Proxy role to the server.
  3. Once this is complete, initiate the configuration wizard.
  4. Use the same configuration parameters as you used when configuring the service initially, namely federation service name (e.g. federation.domain.com), local admin details for the federation server and the federation certificate (unless you’ve replaced the certificate used, in which case obviously you should use the new certificate details); you noted those down during initial configuration, right?
  5. Once configuration is complete, the Remote Access Management Console should open automatically. All of your publishing rules should still be in place, and your published services should be available immediately.

For reference, here’s a sample config file, from which you should be able to reconstruct an appropriate file for your service:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice" type="Microsoft.IdentityServer.Management.Proxy.Configuration.ProxyConfiguration, Microsoft.IdentityServer.Management.Proxy, Version=6.3.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35, processorArchitecture=MSIL" />
  </configSections>

  <microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice>
    <congestionControl latencyThresholdInMSec="8000" minCongestionWindowSize="64"
      enabled="true" connectionTimeoutInSec="60" />
    <connectionPool connectionPoolSize="200" scavengeInterval="5" />
    <diagnostics eventLogLevel="15" />
    <host tlsClientPort="49443" httpPort="80" httpsPort="443" name="federation.domain.com" />
    <proxy address="" />
    <trust thumbprint="1234567890ABCDEF1234567890ABCDEF12345678"
      proxyTrustRenewPeriod="21600" />
  </microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice>
  <!-- <system.serviceModel>
    <diagnostics>
      <messageLogging logEntireMessage="true"
              logMessagesAtServiceLevel="true"
              logMessagesAtTransportLevel="true">
      </messageLogging>
    </diagnostics>
  </system.serviceModel> -->
</configuration>

 

Web Application Proxy Failure Following Outage

Following a ‘hiccup’, involving a Web Application Proxy (WAP) server, internal services were no longer being published to the outside world.

After some investigation, both the ADFS and WAP services showed as stopped on the server. Attempting to start the ADFS service from the services console produced the following error:

Windows could not start the Active Directory Federation Service service on Local Computer.
Error 1064: An exception occurred in the service when handling the control request.

Under the System section of the Windows Event Log, the following error was shown:

Event ID: 7023
The Active Directory Federation Services service terminated with the following error:
An exception occurred in the service when handling the control request.

Followed a few moments later by the following error:

Event ID: 7023
The Web Application Proxy Service terminated with the following error:
A certificate is required to complete client authentication

Looking in the ‘AD FS’ section of the Event Log (under ‘Applications and Services Logs’), the following errors were shown (note that the first error was generally shown multiple times, followed by a single instance of the second error):

Event ID: 383
The Web request failed because the web.config is malformed.
User Action:
Fix the malformed data in the web.config file.
Exception details:
Root element is missing (C:\Windows\ADFS\Config\microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice.exe.config)
Root element is missing.

Followed by:

Event ID: 199
The federation server proxy could not be started.
Reason: Error retrieving proxy configuration from the Federation Service.
Additional Data
Exception details:
An error occurred when attempting to load the proxy configuration.

Checking the file at C:\Windows\ADFS\Config\microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice.exe.config showed that while the file size was still indicated as 2k, the file was blank.

I’ve seen a number of reports online indicating that WAP seems happy to chew up the contents of this configuration file following an outage, although I can find no information on why this might happen. If you have a backup of the file in question, it should be a simple matter to restore this file and restart the ADFS and WAP services to restore service. If you don’t, and have no other example server from which you can pull a similar copy of the file then the following steps must be taken:

  1. Remove the Web Application Proxy role from the server. Once this is complete, a reboot will be required.
  2. Re-add the Web Application Proxy role to the server.
  3. Once this is complete, initiate the configuration wizard.
  4. Use the same configuration parameters as you used when configuring the service initially, namely federation service name (e.g. federation.domain.com), local admin details for the federation server and the federation certificate (unless you’ve replaced the certificate used, in which case obviously you should use the new certificate details); you noted those down during initial configuration, right?
  5. Once configuration is complete, the Remote Access Management Console should open automatically. All of your publishing rules should still be in place, and your published services should be available immediately.

For reference, here’s a sample config file, from which you should be able to reconstruct an appropriate file for your service:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice" type="Microsoft.IdentityServer.Management.Proxy.Configuration.ProxyConfiguration, Microsoft.IdentityServer.Management.Proxy, Version=6.3.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35, processorArchitecture=MSIL" />
  </configSections>

  <microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice>
    <congestionControl latencyThresholdInMSec="8000" minCongestionWindowSize="64"
      enabled="true" connectionTimeoutInSec="60" />
    <connectionPool connectionPoolSize="200" scavengeInterval="5" />
    <diagnostics eventLogLevel="15" />
    <host tlsClientPort="49443" httpPort="80" httpsPort="443" name="federation.domain.com" />
    <proxy address="" />
    <trust thumbprint="1234567890ABCDEF1234567890ABCDEF12345678"
      proxyTrustRenewPeriod="21600" />
  </microsoft.identityServer.proxyservice>
  <!-- <system.serviceModel>
    <diagnostics>
      <messageLogging logEntireMessage="true"
              logMessagesAtServiceLevel="true"
              logMessagesAtTransportLevel="true">
      </messageLogging>
    </diagnostics>
  </system.serviceModel> -->
</configuration>

SharePoint Crawl Rules Appears to Ignore Some URL Protocols

I recently came across an issue relating to crawling people information in SharePoint and the use of crawl rules to exclude certain content.

The issue revolved around a requirement to exclude content contained within peoples’ MySites, but include user profile information so that people searches could still be conducted. The following crawl rule had been configured and was successfully excluding MySite content, but was also excluding the user profile data (crawled using the sps3s:// protocol):

URL Exclude or Include
https://mysite.domain.com/* Exclude

Using the crawl rule test facility indicated that while SharePoint treats http:// and https:// differently, https:// and sps3s:// appear to be treated the same as far as crawling is concerned, so if the above crawl rule is in place, items in the MySite root site collection, both with an https:// and sps3s:// prefix, will not be crawled, and therefore user profile data and people search will not be available:

Crawl rule test

[Screen shot from lab SharePoint 2010 system. however the same tests have been performed against SharePoint 2013 and 2016 with the same results]

In fact what is happening is that the sps3s:// prefix tells SharePoint which connector to use, and in the case of people search, this is translated into a call to a web service at the host specified, i.e. https://mysite.domain.com/_vti_bin/spscrawl.asmx, so the final call that is made is in fact to an https:// prefix, hence the reason that the people data is not crawled.

Replacing the above crawl rule with the following rule corrects the issue allowing people data stored in the MySite root site collection to be indexed and therefore be available for users to search:

URL Exclude or Include
https://mysite.domain.com/personal/* Exclude

WSUS Non-Functional After KB3159706 Installed

Consider the following scenario:

  • You have WSUS installed on either Windows Server 2012 or 2012 R2
  • You install KB3159706

In this situation, WSUS fails to start correctly and thus fails to function.

There are additional steps that are required to configure this update once it is installed. The steps can be found in KB3159706.

Note: If using database mirroring or the SUSDB is part of an AlwaysOn Availability Group, this must be undone before performing the actions described in KB3159706 as a schema update is required for the database.

SPWakeUp for SharePoint 2016

If you use SharePoint, you’ll know that some mechanism to wake up the hosted sites after the application pools are recycled overnight is very helpful (essential even) for the end user experience.

I’ve compiled a version of SPWakeUp for SharePoint 2016, which can be downloaded from https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=439F1389F21A368F%21496648.

If you want to compile this for yourself, this is the method I followed to get the above version:

  1. Grab a copy of the source code for SPWakeUp from https://spwakeup.codeplex.com/downloads/get/152410 and unpack it.
  2. Open the solution in Visual Studio (I used Visual Studio 2015) and allow the automatic upgrade.
  3. Replace the reference to the Microsoft.SharePoint.dll in the solution with one pointing to the SharePoint 2016 version. You’ll want to grab a copy from C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\16\ISAPI on a SharePoint 2016 server.
  4. Modify the target framework for the application. I used 4.6.1 for the build above.
  5. Build either the debug or release version.

Steps Required to Configure WSUS to Distribute Windows 10 Version 1511 Upgrade

Microsoft recently made a hotfix available that patches WSUS on Windows Server 2012 and 2012 R2 to allow Windows 10 upgrade to version 1511. Installing the update is not, however, the only step that is required…

  1. Install the hotfix. This can be downloaded from https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3095113. Ensure that you pick the appropriate hotfix for the version of Windows Server on which you’re running WSUS. Note that if you’re running Windows Server 2012 R2, there’s also a pre-requisite install.
  2. Once the hotfix is installed and you’ve restarted your WSUS server, look in the ‘Products and Classifications’ option under the Classifications tab and ensure that the checkbox for upgrades is selected. This is not selected automatically for you:
    Upgrades Option
    Note that the upgrade files may take quite some time to download to your WSUS server at the next synchronisation.
  3. Add a MIME-Type for ‘.esd application/octet-stream’ in IIS on the WSUS server. To do this:
    Open IIS Manager
    Select the server name
    From the ‘IIS’ area in the centre of IIS Manager, open ‘MIME Types’
    Click ‘Add…’
    Enter the information above:
    Esd MIME Type
    Click OK to close the dialog.
    Note: Without this step, clients will fail to download the upgrade with the following error:
    Installation Failure: Windows failed to install the following update with error 0x8024200D: Upgrade to Windows 10 [SKU], version 1511, 10586.
  4. Approve the Upgrade for the classes of computer in your organisation that you want to be upgraded.

Once all of the above steps are in place, computers that are targeted for the upgrade should have this happen automatically at the next update cycle.